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TUC Study Suggests Working Fathers get Wage Boost

A new report from the TUC has found that working fathers obtain a 21% wage boost and significantly out-earn their childless colleagues by more than a fifth.

Fathers tend to earn 21% more than those without a child according to a study based on 17,000 workers with men with two children earning 9% more than those with just one. Conversely, women who had a child earned 11% less than their counterparts

Gender Pay Gap: Difference Between Fathers and Mothers Earnings

The report, which came from TUC, stated that there was no clear reason for fathers receiving more but experts behind the report said that it was likely to relate to hours worked, increased effort and positive discrimination. According to a separate study, full-time working men with children worked at least half an hour more per day on average. However, it also suggested that there was a damning effect on the trajectory of females who had a child.

As part of the study, the TUC also stated that CVs from fathers were scored higher than those who had no children.  Mothers working full-time were on average found to have suffered a "wage penalty" compared with their childless female colleagues, however, older mothers were said to be paid 12% more. According to many experts, this was because women who gave birth when they were over 33 often had already developed their skills and were more likely to return to full-time work.

TUC general secretary Frances O'Grady said: "It says much about current attitudes that men with children are seen as more committed by employers, while mothers are still often treated as liabilities

The research said: "Financial considerations will be a major factor in decisions about who works and who cares.

“The low statutory pay available during shared parental leave will mean the highest earners - who are disproportionately male - go back to work by default, further entrenching gender gaps in employment, pay, and representation."

According to a recent study from the Office of National Statistics, the recent gender pay gap had fallen in April 2015 to 9.4%.

Equal Pay: Contact us Today

If you believe that you are being underpaid or if you have been overlooked for a promotion or discriminated against due to your gender or family status, you could be entitled to take legal action. Furthermore, if you have been punished for taking leave that was rightfully yours, such as paternity leave, you could also take legal action. Despite a number of steps to eradicate discrimination in the workplace and make sure that all workers are paid fairly and treated equally, sadly, many workers still face discrimination.

At Employment Law Aberdeen, we understand how difficult it can be taking legal action against an employer or former employer. Our team of expert employment solicitors aim to make the process as simple and straightforward as possible. However, in order to make a successful claim, it is vital to have as much evidence as possible to support your claim. Proof of any conversations regarding payment, email chains or even witness statements can be used to try and support your claim. The more information and evidence you provide, the stronger your case is.

To find out whether you could be entitled to compensation for any workplace matter, whether it is discrimination or harassment in the workplace or underpayment, our team of solicitors can help. Get in touch with our team of expert lawyers today using our online contact form.

 

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